Learn about Braille and Louis Braille

When Louis Braille developed his raised dot method of reading and writing while still in his teens, he referred to it as “my alphabet.” The new Louis Braille School website is an online resource for material about Louis Braille and the braille code he devised.

Louis Braille Portrait

The Louis Braille section of the website offers an online biography of Louis Braille, a portrait of Louis Braille done especially for us, FAQs addressing the questions most frequently asked by students working on school reports, and a picture tour of Louis’ home town.

For more information about Louis Braille, we suggest two books:

For high school readers and up, we recommend Louis Braille: A Touch of Genius by C. Michael Mellor. This well researched, richly illustrated book examines the life and times of Louis Braille. It is available in print and in braille from National Braille Press and in print from bookstores and libraries.

For young readers, we suggest A Picture Book of Louis Braille by David A. Adler, illustrated by John and Alexander Wallner. The illustrations give the reader a good feel of what life was like during Louis’ lifetime. Available in print with braille overlays from National Braille Press. Available in print from book stores and libraries.

The braille section of the website contains charts of the braille alphabet and braille numbers, basic punctuation, practice reading exercises using the braille alphabet and simple math equations using braille numbers. The site also includes a brief look at braille contractions and information about the ways people write braille.

We welcome your suggestions of what you would like to see on this website.

Access to communication in the widest sense is access to knowledge, and that is vitally important for us if we are not to go on being despised or patronized by condescending sighted people. We do not need pity, nor do we need to be reminded that we are vulnerable. We must be treated as equals — and communication is the way we can bring this about.

Louis Braille
1841